Review of “The Moors”

A virtual CSU Theatre production

By: Skylar Bridgeforth

Cleveland State University’s Department of Theatre has yet again adapted well to the changes that the theatre community has faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. “The Moors,” directed by Toby Vera Bercovici, is a dark comedy set on the savage moors of the English Countryside. It proved to be a beautiful production, shown over Zoom with digital backgrounds and a moving score corresponding with the scenes. 

The actors interacted seamlessly with one another over the digital platform. Even though there were a few interruptions for technical difficulties, the cast did not waver or break character at any point. 

Within five minutes of watching the play, any lover of classic literature could draw parallels between some of the great novels by the Bronte Sisters, specifically “Jane Eyre” and “Wuthering Heights.” The influence of works by the Bronte Sisters is shown even more when a reference is made alluding to Cathy and Heathcliff, the major characters in “Wuthering Heights.”

Throughout the play, the audience was teased with the fate of the mysterious Master Branwell. Was he dead? Alive? A recluse? Leading them to wonder who wrote the highly spoken about letters to Emilie; clearly written by someone with a high level of education. 

By the end of the play, the audience finds out that Agatha penned the letters to Emilie to draw her to the moors with a nefarious intent- to bear the Branwell heir. Along with the younger sister and maid conspiring to kill Agatha, for a “spot of color” in their lives, only to find out that murder is not as fun on paper as the act itself. 

The entire cast and crew did an amazing job with this final theatre production of the season. “The Moors” was an enjoyable, suspenseful play that gave the audience food for thought.

Show graphic by the CSU Theatre Dept.
Source: CSU Department of Theatre Facebook page

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